Nature
Wednesdays at 7 pm

Snowbound: Animals of Winter | Preview

The coldest and snowiest places on earth, such as the Arctic Circle or Antarctica, pose a challenge to human visitors. But what about the year-round animal population? How do they cope for many months with life in these frozen wonderlands where temperatures can plummet to as low as minus 50 degrees? Find out how these creature adapt to their surroundings or employ clever tactics to survive.

 
Embed
To embed this video, copy and paste the code above.
NATURE, television's longest-running weekly natural history series, has won more than 200 honors from the television industry, parent groups, the international wildlife film community and environmental organizations, including the only award ever given to a television program by the Sierra Club.
Upcoming Air Dates
  • #3310 — Moose: Life of a Twig Eater |
    Sunday, Jan 22 at 7pm TPT LIFE
  • #3310 — Moose: Life of a Twig Eater |
    Monday, Jan 23 at 1am TPT LIFE
  • #3202 — A Sloth Named Velcro |
    Wednesday, Jan 25 at 7pm TPT 2
  • #3202 — A Sloth Named Velcro |
    Thursday, Jan 26 at 1am TPT 2
  • #3202 — A Sloth Named Velcro |
    Sunday, Jan 29 at 8pm TPT LIFE
  • #3202 — A Sloth Named Velcro
    Sloths, once largely ignored, have become a hot topic of scientific researchers. Sanctuaries and rehabilitation centers are also springing up, as development often displaces these gentle creatures. Filmed in Panama, Costa Rica and Colombia, this is a story of friendship between a journalist and the sloth she named Velcro and a network of people working to learn more about sloths in order to protect them.
    Wednesday, Jan 25 at 7pm TPT 2
    Thursday, Jan 26 at 1am TPT 2
    Sunday, Jan 29 at 8pm TPT LIFE
    Monday, Jan 30 at 2am TPT LIFE
  • #3310 — Moose: Life of a Twig Eater
    High up in Canada's Rockies, by a crystal-clear lake rimmed with old-growth forest, a moose is born. At the best of times, the odds are stacked against this leggy 35-pounder surviving its first year; normally less than 50% do. But now populations across many parts of North America are in steep decline and scientists believe one of the reasons is that fewer moose calves are surviving their first year, so it has never been more important to understand what happens in the first year of a moose's life. This stunningly intimate nature documentary, filmed over 13 months in the spectacular wilds of Jasper National Park, takes viewers deep inside the world of moose to experience a mother's love and a calf's first year of life up close and personal.
    Sunday, Jan 22 at 7pm TPT LIFE
    Monday, Jan 23 at 1am TPT LIFE
Passport ad

Introducing

Watch even more of your favorite
PBS and TPT shows online.

Learn More
Top