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Moyers & Company
Bill Moyers returns on-air and online in January 2012 with MOYERS & COMPANY, a weekly hour of compelling and vital conversation about life and the state of American democracy, featuring some of the best thinkers of our time. A range of scholars, artists, activists, scientists, philosophers and newsmakers bring context, insight and meaning to important topics. The series occasionally includes Moyers' own timely and penetrating essays on society and government. In a multimedia marketplace saturated with shallow sound bites and partisan name-calling, MOYERS & COMPANY digs deeper. As the Los Angeles Times put it in 2010, "No one on television has centralized the discussion of ideas as much as Moyers... He not only gives a forum to unusual thinkers, he is truly interested in what they have to say and who they are because he believes their ideas really matter. "

Below is a list of broadcasts scheduled to air in the next 60 days on any of our three channels.

Episode #350
Airs Friday December 19th
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Dec 21st @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No upcoming airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #351
Airs Friday December 26th
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Dec 28th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No upcoming airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #352
Airs Friday January 2nd
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Jan 4th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No upcoming airings of this
episode on this channel.


This list includes any broadcasts that aired in the past 2 months on any of our three channels.

Episode #349
Democrats Bow Down To Wall Street
Bill Moyers talks about trade and politics with outspoken veteran journalist John "Rick" MacArthur, president and publisher of Harper's Magazine. Since 1850, Harper's has thrown open its pages to some of the most ferociously independent voices in American letters -- from Mark Twain, Jack London and Herman Melville to William Styron, Joyce Carol Oates and David Foster Wallace. This author and former newspaperman is resolute in his conviction that while blogging and social media have their place, they are no substitute for journalism. Harper's has a website, but all of its material is behind a paywall - you have to subscribe to the print edition of the magazine to see it. "The web is bad for writers," he told The New York Times this past summer. They're "too exhausted by the pace of an endless news cycle to write poised, reflective stories and... are paid peanuts if they do... And it's bad for readers, who cannot absorb information well on devices that buzz, flash and generally distract." During his more than three decades at the magazine, Rick MacArthur has been as ferocious a champion of democracy and journalism as any of those illustrious bylines that have appeared in its pages -- whether he's writing in Harper's or in such books as The Selling of Free Trade, an expose of how Democrats and Republicans colluded to enact NAFTA -- the North American Free Trade Agreement, and this one - The Outrageous Barriers to Democracy in America. Not only is Rick MacArthur an iconoclast when it comes to cyberspace, he's also outspoken on politics and culture, and in two languages - English and French. In addition to books and his duties at the magazine, he writes opinion columns for the Providence Journal in Rhode Island and a French language newspaper Le Devoir in Montreal. His fierce arrows of outrage are aimed at both political parties, but recently he has been especially incensed by Democrats for abandoning their progressive roots to serve Wall Street, K Street and a cabal of crony capitalists.
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Dec 14th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #348
The United States of Ferguson
In the wake of grand juries in Missouri and New York's Staten Island deciding not to indict white police officers in the deaths of unarmed African Americans, Moyers & Company presents an encore broadcast of Bill Moyers' conversation earlier this year with journalist Ta-Nehisi Coates. First telecast in May 2014, Coates had just written a cover story in The Atlantic magazine, provocatively titled "The Case for Reparations." It urged that we begin a national dialogue on whether the United States should compensate African Americans not only as recognition of slavery's "ancient brutality" -- as President Lyndon Johnson called it - but also as acknowledgement of all the prejudice and discrimination that have followed in a direct line from this, our original sin. His words remarkably prescient in the light of recent events, Coates explained to Moyers, "I am not asking you, as a white person, to see yourself as an enslaver. I'm asking you as an American to see all of the freedoms that you enjoy and see how they are rooted in things that the country you belong to condoned or actively participated in in the past. And that covers everything from enslavement to the era of lynching, when we effectively decided that we weren't going to afford African Americans the same level of protection of the law... "There are plenty of African Americans in this country-- and I would say that this goes right up to the White House-- who are not by any means poor, but are very much afflicted by white supremacy." Reparations, Coates said, are "What the United States, first of all, really owes African Americans, but not far behind that, what it owes itself, because this is really about our health as a country... I firmly believe that reparation is a chance to be pioneers. We say we set all these examples about liberty and freedom and democracy and all that great stuff. Well, here's an opportunity for us to live that out." Ta-Nehisi Coates has written for many publications, including The New York Times and The Washington Post. He is a senior editor for The Atlantic magazine and author of the 2008 memoir, "The Beautiful Struggle: A Father, Two Sons, and an Unlikely Road to Manhood."
24 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Dec 7th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #347
The Long, Dark Shadows of Plutocracy
Inequality is a deep and divisive reality. Across our country, millions of people of ordinary means can't afford decent housing. The middle class is being squeezed out as the wealthy drive up real estate values and the working poor are shoved farther into squalor. In "Dark Shadows," a special Moyers & Company essay, Bill Moyers tells how a portion of the famous skyline of Manhattan, towering above the south end of Central Park, is becoming a symbol of how wealth and power get their way without regard for the impact on the lives and neighborhoods of everyday people. Exclusive skyscrapers, climbing higher than ever before, are blocking the light, throwing enormous swathes of the park into darkness. What's more, the apartments are being sold at sky high prices in the multimillions to the international superrich, many of whom will only live in them part-time - if at all -- and often pay little or no city income or property taxes, thanks to the political clout of real estate developers. "The real estate industry here in New York City is like the oil industry in Texas," affordable housing advocate Jaron Benjamin says, "They outspend everybody... They often have a much better relationship with elected officials than everyday New Yorkers do." Meanwhile, fewer and fewer middle and working class people can afford to live in New York City. "The internationalization of New York once meant something actually kind of exotic and exciting and enhanced our diversity," Vanity Fair architecture critic Paul Goldberger notes. "Today, internationalization... seems to symbolize not diversity but a kind of exclusivity." And Jaron Benjamin declares, "Forget about the Statue of Liberty. Forget about Ellis Island. Forget about the idea of everybody being welcome here in New York City. This will be a city only for rich people."
24 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Nov 30th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #346
How Public Power Can Defeat Plutocrats
This week, Lawrence Lessig and Zephyr Teachout return to talk further about the corrupting influence of money in politics, a subject both have studied as scholars and fought against as reformers. Government has become a clearinghouse for corporations and plutocrats with deep pockets to buy the politicians who grease the wheels for lucrative contracts and easy regulation. It's all pay for play, and look the other way. Consider this from the watchdog Sunlight Foundation: From 2007 to 2012, two hundred corporations spent almost $6 billion for lobbying and campaign contributions. And they received more than $4 trillion in government contracts and other forms of assistance. That's why K Street is lobbying's road to Paradise. Now that the midterm elections are over, it's payback time, with the newly elected Congress ready to deliver to those who invested well in their chosen candidates. Lawrence Lessig teaches at Harvard Law School and made his reputation as an expert on the Internet. He started the Mayday SuperPac, raising millions for congressional candidates who vowed to fight for campaign finance reform. All but two of them lost - but the fight continues. He tells Bill Moyers, "When we look at the systematic way in which our representatives are responsive not to the people alone, but increasingly to the funders exclusively, then that is an obvious corruption... This is not a Democratic issue. This is not a Republican issue. This is an American issue." Zephyr Teachout, who teaches at Fordham Law School, ran for Governor of New York, trying to rouse the public against corruption in state government. She got more than a third of the vote in the Democratic primary. Teachout also is the author of Corruption in America: From Benjamin Franklin's Snuff Box to Citizens United. "When you talk about the corruption in Congress, people are talking about the same thing that Madison was talking about," she says, "this sense that our public servants are just serving themselves. They're running away with the resources of our country."
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Nov 23rd @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #345
The Bare Knuckle Fight Against Money in Politics
In this turbulent midterm election year, two academics decided to practice what they preached. They left the classroom, confronted the reality of down-and-dirty politics, and tried to replace moneyed interests with the public interest. Neither was successful - this year, at least - but on this week's edition of Moyers & Company, they discuss with Bill Moyers their experiences and the hard-fought lessons learned about the state of American democracy. Lawrence Lessig teaches law at Harvard, is director of that university's Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics and founded the University of Chicago's Center for Internet and Society. A well-known Internet activist and campaign finance reform advocate, this election cycle, he started Mayday.US, a crowd-funded SuperPAC to end all SuperPACs. Its mission, Lessig says, is to reduce the influence of money in politics and make it politically toxic to oppose campaign finance reform. Lessig's six congressional picks in truly competitive races went down to defeat in the midterms, but he told a reporter, "The fight to root out corruption in our politics is one of the most important in our time, and we will continue to pursue it with fierce urgency." Zephyr Teachout is a professor of constitutional and property law at Fordham Law School and this year became a political candidate - going up against incumbent New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo in the Democratic primary. She received more than a third of the vote and carried 30 of the state's 62 counties, surprising everyone - including Cuomo. Her new book, "Corruption in America," is a history of the corrosive influence of money in politics. In it she writes, "What America now faces, if we do not change the fundamental structures of the relationship of money to legislative power, is neither mob rule nor democracy, but oligarchy."
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Nov 16th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #344
Facing Down Corporate Election Greed
In the midst of the midterm elections and the obsession with which party would control the US Senate, there were races at the local and state level with deeper implications for the future of the country. In the small city of Richmond, California, a slate of progressive candidates faced off against a challenge from pro-business candidates backed to the tune of more than $3 million by the energy giant Chevron. For years, Chevron has treated Richmond like a company town and its large refinery there has been a constant source of health and safety concerns. Among children in Richmond, hospitalization for asthma is nearly twice the national rate. There has been a series of leaks and explosions, and smoke from a 2012 fire at the refinery sent 15,000 to area hospitals for treatment. Since 2007, Mayor Gayle McLaughlin, a Green Party leader, and her allies on the city council have faced down not only Chevron but other corporate interests like the real estate and financial industries as well. This year, Chevron fought back with an expensive barrage of negative campaign media. But on Election Day, the progressive slate triumphed, despite the nearly $ 300 per vote Chevron spent. On this week's Moyers & Company, Gayle McLaughlin - who this year was term limited as mayor but won a city council seat -- and Harriet Rowan, a college student and journalist who uncovered the Chevron money story for the news website "Richmond Confidential," talk with Bill Moyers about the role unlimited sums of corporate cash played in Richmond. They discuss the great success of the billions spent by wealthy individuals and companies in other races across the country and how to fight back, using Richmond's example as a model for future fights of organized people versus organized money.
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Nov 9th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #343
Breaking Big Money's Grip On Elections
On this week's Moyers & Company (check local listings), just days before the midterm elections, Bernie Sanders, Vermont's independent US Senator, is angry about what he sees as big money's wholesale purchase of political power. It's a grave threat, he believes, not only to our electoral process but democracy itself. Just two weeks ago, Senator Sanders was on the other side of the country at a town meeting in Richmond, California. He was there to fire up the supporters of Mayor Gayle McLaughlin and a slate of progressive city council candidates running this year against a ticket backed by the energy giant Chevron, the third largest corporation in the United States. Chevron owns an enormous refinery in Richmond and is spending $3 million to defeat the progressives, who have charged the oil company with damaging the city's economy and environment. Chevron's Richmond money - they're spending at least $100 per voter - is just a fraction of the billions being spent on this year's elections, the most expensive midterms in history. The money has been unleashed by Citizens United, McCutcheon and other court decisions that have turned voting into an auction with the prize to the highest bidder. Because the Supreme Court says money is speech and big business can buy all it wants, corporations are trying to drown out the voice of anyone trying to speak out against them, whether in Congress or a state legislature, on a judge's bench or in city hall. "Apparently for these guys, owning and controlling our economy is not enough," Senator Sanders told the rally. "They now want to own and control the government. And we are not going to allow them to do that. Not in Richmond, not anywhere."
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Nov 2nd @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #342
The Fight - and The Right - To Vote
In the last four years, close to half the states in the US have passed laws restricting the right to vote, the most fundamental principle of democracy. A new nationwide effort to suppress the vote, nurtured by the Republican Party's desire to hold onto political power, fear and fierce resistance to inevitable demographic change, has hammered the country. Shelby County v. Holder, last year's Supreme Court decision revoking an essential provision of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, upped the ante and has encouraged many states to try to impose restrictive voter ID laws, as well as gerrymander congressional districts and limit registration and voting hours. The argument made in favor of this vast disenfranchisement is rampant voter fraud -- that people manipulate the system to cheat and throw elections. But in state after state, there is rarely proof of anyone showing up at the polling place and trying to illegally cast a ballot. This week Bill Moyers talks with an attorney and journalist, each of whom has been deeply involved in the ongoing vote suppression controversy. Sherrilynn Ifill is president and director-counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, a noted civil rights litigator whose work has included landmark voting rights cases. She notes that, "A core tenet of the civil rights movement rested on the centrality of voting as an expression of citizenship and dignity in our republic." Ari Berman is a contributing writer for The Nation magazine and author of the upcoming book, Give Us the Ballot: The Modern Struggle for Voting Rights in America. "Just as Dixiecrats once used poll taxes and literacy tests to bar black Southerners from voting," he has written, "a new crop of GOP governors and state legislators has passed a series of seemingly disconnected measures that could prevent millions of students, minorities, immigrants, ex-convicts and the elderly from casting ballots."
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Oct 26th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #341
Keeping Faith in Democracy
Marilynne Robinson's new book, Lila, has been acclaimed by critics as "unflinching," "an exquisite novel of spiritual redemption and love," and "a book whose grandeur is found in its humility." This week, it was nominated for the National Book Award, the latest of a series of books set in a fictional Iowa town that began with the Pulitzer Prize-winning Gilead, published in 2004. In addition to her fiction, Robinson is also an accomplished essayist, and on this week's edition of Moyers & Company, Bill Moyers talks with her about her fervent belief in the power of grace and faith and her devotion to democracy, which she fears "we are gravely in danger of losing." She tells Moyers, "It seems sometimes as if political discourse is the cheapest intellectual environment that you can enter into... I think that pandering has seduced a lot of public behavior, made people operate at levels that they would not really consider worthy of themselves.... We relapse into what are these ancient models of cruelty and injustice." Marilynne Robinson received the 2012 National Humanities Medal from President Obama for the "moral strength and lyrical clarity" of her work. In addition to her books, she has written for a variety of publications, including Harper's, The Paris Review, and the New York Times Book Review. She is a professor of English and Creative Writing at the University of Iowa's renowned Writers' Workshop.
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Oct 19th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

tpt Life Channel 2.3

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.


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