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Moyers & Company
Bill Moyers returns on-air and online in January 2012 with MOYERS & COMPANY, a weekly hour of compelling and vital conversation about life and the state of American democracy, featuring some of the best thinkers of our time. A range of scholars, artists, activists, scientists, philosophers and newsmakers bring context, insight and meaning to important topics. The series occasionally includes Moyers' own timely and penetrating essays on society and government. In a multimedia marketplace saturated with shallow sound bites and partisan name-calling, MOYERS & COMPANY digs deeper. As the Los Angeles Times put it in 2010, "No one on television has centralized the discussion of ideas as much as Moyers... He not only gives a forum to unusual thinkers, he is truly interested in what they have to say and who they are because he believes their ideas really matter. "

Below is a list of broadcasts scheduled to air in the next 60 days on any of our three channels.

Episode #347
Airs Friday November 28th
24 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Nov 30th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No upcoming airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #348
Airs Friday December 5th
24 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Dec 7th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No upcoming airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #349
Airs Friday December 12th
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Dec 14th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No upcoming airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #350
Airs Friday December 19th
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Dec 21st @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No upcoming airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #351
Airs Friday December 26th
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Dec 28th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No upcoming airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #352
Airs Friday January 2nd
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Jan 4th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No upcoming airings of this
episode on this channel.

tpt Life Channel 2.3

Fri Jan 2nd @ 9:00 pm


This list includes any broadcasts that aired in the past 2 months on any of our three channels.

Episode #346
How Public Power Can Defeat Plutocrats
This week, Lawrence Lessig and Zephyr Teachout return to talk further about the corrupting influence of money in politics, a subject both have studied as scholars and fought against as reformers. Government has become a clearinghouse for corporations and plutocrats with deep pockets to buy the politicians who grease the wheels for lucrative contracts and easy regulation. It's all pay for play, and look the other way. Consider this from the watchdog Sunlight Foundation: From 2007 to 2012, two hundred corporations spent almost $6 billion for lobbying and campaign contributions. And they received more than $4 trillion in government contracts and other forms of assistance. That's why K Street is lobbying's road to Paradise. Now that the midterm elections are over, it's payback time, with the newly elected Congress ready to deliver to those who invested well in their chosen candidates. Lawrence Lessig teaches at Harvard Law School and made his reputation as an expert on the Internet. He started the Mayday SuperPac, raising millions for congressional candidates who vowed to fight for campaign finance reform. All but two of them lost - but the fight continues. He tells Bill Moyers, "When we look at the systematic way in which our representatives are responsive not to the people alone, but increasingly to the funders exclusively, then that is an obvious corruption... This is not a Democratic issue. This is not a Republican issue. This is an American issue." Zephyr Teachout, who teaches at Fordham Law School, ran for Governor of New York, trying to rouse the public against corruption in state government. She got more than a third of the vote in the Democratic primary. Teachout also is the author of Corruption in America: From Benjamin Franklin's Snuff Box to Citizens United. "When you talk about the corruption in Congress, people are talking about the same thing that Madison was talking about," she says, "this sense that our public servants are just serving themselves. They're running away with the resources of our country."
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Nov 23rd @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #345
The Bare Knuckle Fight Against Money in Politics
In this turbulent midterm election year, two academics decided to practice what they preached. They left the classroom, confronted the reality of down-and-dirty politics, and tried to replace moneyed interests with the public interest. Neither was successful - this year, at least - but on this week's edition of Moyers & Company, they discuss with Bill Moyers their experiences and the hard-fought lessons learned about the state of American democracy. Lawrence Lessig teaches law at Harvard, is director of that university's Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics and founded the University of Chicago's Center for Internet and Society. A well-known Internet activist and campaign finance reform advocate, this election cycle, he started Mayday.US, a crowd-funded SuperPAC to end all SuperPACs. Its mission, Lessig says, is to reduce the influence of money in politics and make it politically toxic to oppose campaign finance reform. Lessig's six congressional picks in truly competitive races went down to defeat in the midterms, but he told a reporter, "The fight to root out corruption in our politics is one of the most important in our time, and we will continue to pursue it with fierce urgency." Zephyr Teachout is a professor of constitutional and property law at Fordham Law School and this year became a political candidate - going up against incumbent New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo in the Democratic primary. She received more than a third of the vote and carried 30 of the state's 62 counties, surprising everyone - including Cuomo. Her new book, "Corruption in America," is a history of the corrosive influence of money in politics. In it she writes, "What America now faces, if we do not change the fundamental structures of the relationship of money to legislative power, is neither mob rule nor democracy, but oligarchy."
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Nov 16th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #344
Facing Down Corporate Election Greed
In the midst of the midterm elections and the obsession with which party would control the US Senate, there were races at the local and state level with deeper implications for the future of the country. In the small city of Richmond, California, a slate of progressive candidates faced off against a challenge from pro-business candidates backed to the tune of more than $3 million by the energy giant Chevron. For years, Chevron has treated Richmond like a company town and its large refinery there has been a constant source of health and safety concerns. Among children in Richmond, hospitalization for asthma is nearly twice the national rate. There has been a series of leaks and explosions, and smoke from a 2012 fire at the refinery sent 15,000 to area hospitals for treatment. Since 2007, Mayor Gayle McLaughlin, a Green Party leader, and her allies on the city council have faced down not only Chevron but other corporate interests like the real estate and financial industries as well. This year, Chevron fought back with an expensive barrage of negative campaign media. But on Election Day, the progressive slate triumphed, despite the nearly $ 300 per vote Chevron spent. On this week's Moyers & Company, Gayle McLaughlin - who this year was term limited as mayor but won a city council seat -- and Harriet Rowan, a college student and journalist who uncovered the Chevron money story for the news website "Richmond Confidential," talk with Bill Moyers about the role unlimited sums of corporate cash played in Richmond. They discuss the great success of the billions spent by wealthy individuals and companies in other races across the country and how to fight back, using Richmond's example as a model for future fights of organized people versus organized money.
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Nov 9th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #343
Breaking Big Money's Grip On Elections
On this week's Moyers & Company (check local listings), just days before the midterm elections, Bernie Sanders, Vermont's independent US Senator, is angry about what he sees as big money's wholesale purchase of political power. It's a grave threat, he believes, not only to our electoral process but democracy itself. Just two weeks ago, Senator Sanders was on the other side of the country at a town meeting in Richmond, California. He was there to fire up the supporters of Mayor Gayle McLaughlin and a slate of progressive city council candidates running this year against a ticket backed by the energy giant Chevron, the third largest corporation in the United States. Chevron owns an enormous refinery in Richmond and is spending $3 million to defeat the progressives, who have charged the oil company with damaging the city's economy and environment. Chevron's Richmond money - they're spending at least $100 per voter - is just a fraction of the billions being spent on this year's elections, the most expensive midterms in history. The money has been unleashed by Citizens United, McCutcheon and other court decisions that have turned voting into an auction with the prize to the highest bidder. Because the Supreme Court says money is speech and big business can buy all it wants, corporations are trying to drown out the voice of anyone trying to speak out against them, whether in Congress or a state legislature, on a judge's bench or in city hall. "Apparently for these guys, owning and controlling our economy is not enough," Senator Sanders told the rally. "They now want to own and control the government. And we are not going to allow them to do that. Not in Richmond, not anywhere."
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Nov 2nd @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #342
The Fight - and The Right - To Vote
In the last four years, close to half the states in the US have passed laws restricting the right to vote, the most fundamental principle of democracy. A new nationwide effort to suppress the vote, nurtured by the Republican Party's desire to hold onto political power, fear and fierce resistance to inevitable demographic change, has hammered the country. Shelby County v. Holder, last year's Supreme Court decision revoking an essential provision of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, upped the ante and has encouraged many states to try to impose restrictive voter ID laws, as well as gerrymander congressional districts and limit registration and voting hours. The argument made in favor of this vast disenfranchisement is rampant voter fraud -- that people manipulate the system to cheat and throw elections. But in state after state, there is rarely proof of anyone showing up at the polling place and trying to illegally cast a ballot. This week Bill Moyers talks with an attorney and journalist, each of whom has been deeply involved in the ongoing vote suppression controversy. Sherrilynn Ifill is president and director-counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, a noted civil rights litigator whose work has included landmark voting rights cases. She notes that, "A core tenet of the civil rights movement rested on the centrality of voting as an expression of citizenship and dignity in our republic." Ari Berman is a contributing writer for The Nation magazine and author of the upcoming book, Give Us the Ballot: The Modern Struggle for Voting Rights in America. "Just as Dixiecrats once used poll taxes and literacy tests to bar black Southerners from voting," he has written, "a new crop of GOP governors and state legislators has passed a series of seemingly disconnected measures that could prevent millions of students, minorities, immigrants, ex-convicts and the elderly from casting ballots."
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Oct 26th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #341
Keeping Faith in Democracy
Marilynne Robinson's new book, Lila, has been acclaimed by critics as "unflinching," "an exquisite novel of spiritual redemption and love," and "a book whose grandeur is found in its humility." This week, it was nominated for the National Book Award, the latest of a series of books set in a fictional Iowa town that began with the Pulitzer Prize-winning Gilead, published in 2004. In addition to her fiction, Robinson is also an accomplished essayist, and on this week's edition of Moyers & Company, Bill Moyers talks with her about her fervent belief in the power of grace and faith and her devotion to democracy, which she fears "we are gravely in danger of losing." She tells Moyers, "It seems sometimes as if political discourse is the cheapest intellectual environment that you can enter into... I think that pandering has seduced a lot of public behavior, made people operate at levels that they would not really consider worthy of themselves.... We relapse into what are these ancient models of cruelty and injustice." Marilynne Robinson received the 2012 National Humanities Medal from President Obama for the "moral strength and lyrical clarity" of her work. In addition to her books, she has written for a variety of publications, including Harper's, The Paris Review, and the New York Times Book Review. She is a professor of English and Creative Writing at the University of Iowa's renowned Writers' Workshop.
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Oct 19th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #340
Restoring an America That Has Lost Its Way
Three years ago, reporter and former New York Times columnist Bob Herbert took to the road and traveled across the United States. What he discovered is chronicled in his new book, "Losing Our Way," stories of brave, hard-working men and women battered by the economic downturn. He found an America in which jobs have disappeared, infrastructure is falling apart and the "virtuous cycle" of well-paid workers spending their wages to power the economy and spark further growth has been broken by greed and the gap between the very rich and everyone else. He tells Bill Moyers, "We've lost our way... We've established a power structure in which the great corporations and the big banks have allied themselves with the national government and, in many cases, local government to pursue corporate interests and financial interests as opposed to those things that would be in the best interests of ordinary working people... It's supposed to be an egalitarian society, a society of rising standards of living, a society of a vast and thriving middle class. And we are getting farther and farther away from that ideal." As for solutions, Herbert says, "People need to start voting against the excessive power of the great moneyed interests. But more than that, we need a movement, a grass roots movement that will fight for the interests of ordinary men and women and for this new generation of Americans that's coming along right now." For nearly two decades, Bob Herbert was a columnist for The New York Times, following a notable newspaper reporting career. He is now a Senior Distinguished Fellow at the public policy and analysis think tank, Demos, and a board member of the Schumann Media Center, from which he is presently on leave working on a major documentary.
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Oct 12th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #339
Too Big To Jail?
As President Obama contemplates who will replace Eric Holder, who announced his resignation last week, some lawmakers and outside groups are urging the president to take a tougher position against the financial sector when selecting the next Attorney General. And for good reason. While large banks have been penalized for their role in the housing meltdown, which led to the Great Recession, not a single senior executive has been criminally prosecuted. This week on Moyers & Company (check local listings), veteran bank regulator William K. Black speaks to Moyers about the fraudulent behavior by senior executives that led to the financial crisis, the lack of government oversight that contributed to the meltdown and the deeply-entrenched culture of corruption that's existed for decades. "I blame Holder. I blame Timothy Geithner," Black tells Moyers. "But they are fulfilling administration policies. The problem definitely comes from the top. And remember-- Obama wouldn't have been president but for the financial contribution of bankers." William K. Black is associate professor of economics and law at the University of Missouri - Kansas City. He is a white-collar criminologist and a veteran financial regulator and author of The Best Way to Rob a Bank Is to Own One. During the savings and loan scandals of the 1980s Black helped prosecutors convict more than 1,000 bankers. Acclaimed as a litigator himself, he exposed five United States Senators - the Keating Five - who helped Keating cover up his crimes after collecting big campaign contributions.
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Oct 5th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #338
America's New War in The Middle East
Jonathan Landay is one of the unsung heroes of Washington journalism. During the buildup to the invasion of Iraq in 2003 he and his colleagues at McClatchy newspapers got the story right, reporting that the government was cooking the intelligence books to make the case for war and that Vice President Dick Cheney and others were even lying. But "official" Washington, including the mainstream media, ignored the inconvenient truths -- with disastrous results. Now Landay is analyzing President Obama's decision to use air power against Sunni Islamic militants in Syria and Iraq: what's different from 11 years ago? Is U.S. intelligence reliable? Last July Landay wrote that the Obama administration knew ISIS was growing but did little to counter it. Why? What has changed? Landay and Moyers are joined by Matthew Hoh, a former Marine Corps captain who fought in Iraq, then joined the Foreign Service and became the widely admired and effective senior American civilian in Afghanistan's Zabul province, a Taliban stronghold. But Hoh resigned in protest when he came to believe that the war was only fueling the insurgency that American troops were trying to put down. In his resignation letter Hoh wrote: "I fail to see the value or the worth in continued U.S. casualties or expenditures of resources in support of the Afghan government in what is, truly, a 35-year old civil war." Now, says Landay, the nightmare of Groundhog Day is happening again -- we face the same problem over and over. Although President Obama has been trying "everything possible" to avoid fighting in the Middle East, we are once again at war there and no one can predict how or when this new round of conflict will end.
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

tpt Life Channel 2.3

Sat Sep 27th @ 3:00 am


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