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Moyers & Company
Bill Moyers returns on-air and online in January 2012 with MOYERS & COMPANY, a weekly hour of compelling and vital conversation about life and the state of American democracy, featuring some of the best thinkers of our time. A range of scholars, artists, activists, scientists, philosophers and newsmakers bring context, insight and meaning to important topics. The series occasionally includes Moyers' own timely and penetrating essays on society and government. In a multimedia marketplace saturated with shallow sound bites and partisan name-calling, MOYERS & COMPANY digs deeper. As the Los Angeles Times put it in 2010, "No one on television has centralized the discussion of ideas as much as Moyers... He not only gives a forum to unusual thinkers, he is truly interested in what they have to say and who they are because he believes their ideas really matter. "

Below is a list of broadcasts scheduled to air in the next 60 days on any of our three channels.

Episode #335
Airs Friday September 5th
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Sep 7th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No upcoming airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #336
Airs Friday September 12th
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Sep 14th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No upcoming airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #337
Airs Friday September 19th
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Sep 21st @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No upcoming airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #338
Airs Friday September 26th
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Sep 28th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No upcoming airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #339
Airs Friday October 3rd
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Oct 5th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No upcoming airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #340
Airs Friday October 10th
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Oct 12th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No upcoming airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #341
Airs Friday October 17th
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Oct 19th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No upcoming airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #342
Airs Friday October 24th
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Oct 26th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No upcoming airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #343
Airs Friday October 31st
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

No upcoming airings of this
episode on this channel.

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No upcoming airings of this
episode on this channel.


This list includes any broadcasts that aired in the past 2 months on any of our three channels.

Episode #334
Stiglitz On Tax Reform To Save The Middle Class
This week, in an encore presentation of Moyers & Company (check local listings), the Nobel Laureate economist Joseph E. Stiglitz says he's infuriated by America's growing inequality and at how the tax code has been manipulated and abused to place the burden on the earners of ordinary income -- instead of the rich and powerful most able to pay. "We already have a system that isn't working," he tells Bill Moyers. "... That has contributed to making America the most unequal society of the advanced countries... But he has a solution. Joseph Stiglitz recently published a call to action, a 27-page report for the Roosevelt Institute on how to reform our tax system and rebuild our country. "We can have a tax system that can help create a fairer society," he says. "Only ask the people at the top to pay their fair share. It's not asking a lot. It's just saying the top 1% shouldn't be paying a lower tax rate than somebody much further down the scale - [they] shouldn't have the opportunity to move money offshore." Stiglitz believes that taxes can be used as incentives: "If your taxes say we want to encourage real investments in America, then you get real investment in America... But I also believe that you have to shape incentives and that markets on their own don't necessarily shape them the right way." Now a professor at Columbia University, Joseph E. Stiglitz served as chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers in the Clinton White House, as chief economist of the World Bank and is currently president of the International Economic Association. He is a best-selling author with a worldwide following that includes presidents and prime ministers.
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Aug 31st @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #333
No To Tax Dodgers, Yes To Fair Play
When it comes to paying taxes, the latest ploy in corporate America's never-ending search for loopholes and escape hatches is "inversion," creative accounting by which companies pretend to be headquartered abroad and make big profits on which they pay little or no US taxes. Inversion is just one more way jobs are being lost overseas and revenue is being drained from government and its services. That's why a recent report by Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph E. Stiglitz for the Roosevelt Institute is so important. Paying a fair share of taxes and cracking down on corporate tax dodgers, Stiglitz writes, could be a cure for inequality and a faltering economy. This week in an encore presentation of Moyers & Company (check local listings), Stiglitz tells Bill Moyers that Apple, Google, GE and a host of other Fortune 500 companies are creating what amounts to "an unlimited IRA for corporations." He says, "I think we can use our tax system to create a better society, to be an expression of our true values... But if people don't think that their tax system is fair, they're not going to want to contribute. It's going to be difficult to get them to pay. And, unfortunately, right now, our tax system is neither fair nor efficient... We have a tax system that reflects not the interest of the middle. We have a tax system that reflects the interest of the one percent." Joseph Stiglitz's best-selling books, including The Price of Inequality, The Trillion Dollar War and Freefall have shaped worldwide debates on globalization, income inequality and the role of government in the financial marketplace. He is currently a professor at Columbia University, a senior fellow at the Roosevelt Institute and president of the International Economic Association. Stiglitz served as chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers under President Bill Clinton, and as chief economist of the World Bank.
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Aug 24th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #332
Facing Evil With Maya Angelou
In this second of two programs celebrating the life and work of the late Maya Angelou, Bill Moyers revisits a 1988 documentary in which he and Angelou attended a conference on "Facing Evil," held in the Hill Country of central Texas. Evil was a topic about which Angelou, the victim of childhood rape and virulent racism, had a lot to say. Rape caused her to retreat into silence for five years. she said, and was "a dire kind of evil, because rape on the body of a young person more often than not introduces cynicism, and there is nothing quite so tragic as a young cynic, because it means the person has gone from knowing nothing to believing nothing. In my case I was saved in that muteness, you see, in the sordida, I was saved. And I was able to draw from human thought, human disappointments and triumphs, enough to triumph myself." She recites the lyrics of a song she wrote for Roberta Flack about Angelou's crippled Uncle Willie, who made sure she and others knew their lessons and "left for our generation and generations to come a legacy so rich. " She reads from the poetry of African-American poet Paul Laurence Dunbar as well her own: "There in those pleated faces/I see the auction block/The chains and slavery's coffles/The whip and lash and stock./My fathers speak in voices/That shred my fact and sound/They say, but, sugar, it was our submission/that made your world go round.'' She tells the conference, "We need the courage to create ourselves daily, to be bodacious enough to create ourselves daily -- as Christians, as Jews, as Muslims, as thinking, caring, laughing, loving human beings," she says. I think that the courage to confront evil and turn it by dint of will into something applicable to the development of our evolution, individually and collectively, is exciting, honorable."
24 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Aug 17th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #331
Going Home With Maya Angelou
Over the years and on several occasions, Bill Moyers interviewed Maya Angelou, the legendary author who died in late May. In this first of two programs celebrating her extraordinary life and legacy, Moyers revisits an episode from his 1982 series "Creativity" in which he and Angelou returned to the small town of Stamps, Arkansas, where she spent much of her childhood. Walking with Moyers, she remembers a place where she was "terribly hurt... and vastly loved." Stamps, Arkansas, was deeply segregated, divided by railroad tracks that split the town into black and white. "This was more or less a no man's land here... If you were black you never felt really safe when you simply crossed the railroad tracks," she says. "... And I used to have to walk over here. Oh gosh, I hated it. I had no protection at all over there. I had an idea of protection on this side. I had my grandmother on this side. I had the church, my uncle, and all my people were on this side. So I had an idea of protection, but there I would be all alone and I loathed it, crossing those railroad tracks." Angelou, who had been traumatized by rape at the age of seven-and-a-half and did not speak for several years, found her voice again with the help of a family friend, Mrs. Flowers, who "told me poetry was music written for the human voice" and encouraged her to read aloud. The great writers she read, the music she heard in church, and the scars of racial discrimination guided her toward the writing career that made her famous. "I am a writer and Stamps must remain for me in that nebulous, unreal reality, because I'm a poet and I have to draw from these shadows, these densities, these phantasmagorias for my poetry," Angelou tells Moyers. "I don't want it to become a place on the map, because the truth is you never can leave home. You take it with you everywhere you go."
24 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Aug 10th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #330
John Lithgow On The Role of a Lifetime
Back in the seventies, a time of Vietnam and Watergate, war and corruption, disaffected youth flocked to productions of Shakespeare's "Hamlet," the story of a young prince angered by betrayal and the abuse of power. Today, in an era of aging baby boomers and an unstable world, we're surrounded by productions of Shakespeare's "King Lear," the story of an elderly monarch losing strength and sanity, seeking order in uncertainty. Why are we so drawn these days to the tale of Lear and his dysfunctional family? John Lithgow, the award-winning actor and writer is playing him right now in The Public Theater's free Shakespeare in the Park production, and on this week's edition of Moyers & Company (check local listings), he tells Bill Moyers what it's like to perform the monumental role and what he thinks its significance is in a time of so much violence and unrest. Lithgow has been blogging about the experience in The New York Times. "'King Lear' is full of high-pitched, raw emotion," he wrote. "From day one, I've been tracking Lear's journey into madness. It's a journey fueled by humiliation, anger, regret and sorrow. His interaction with every character he confronts... is scaldingly intense. I've found it impossible to rehearse the role dispassionately. Try as I may to restrain myself, the emotions simply run away with me." John Lithgow is a constant and notable presence on stage, television and in the movies; twice a Tony winner, recipient of five Emmy Awards (three for "Third Rock from the Sun") and two-time Oscar nominee ("The World According to Garp," "Terms of Endearment"). He is the author of several books for kids, an acting memoir and editor of a collection of poetry, "Poet's Corner." His new film, "Love Is Strange," opens in three weeks, and he has begun rehearsals with Glenn Close for the Broadway revival of Edward Albee's "A Delicate Balance."
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Aug 3rd @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #329
The Conscience of a Compassionate Conservative
Arthur C. Brooks says that despite the heated rhetoric of the far right, the compassionate conservatism once touted by George W. Bush isn't dead. It's alive and well at the conservative American Enterprise Institute -- AEI - where Brooks became president in 2009. Residing now at the top of the conservative pecking order in Washington, Brooks advises Republican leaders in Congress and spreads AEI's message to a wider audience. His specialty, as Newsweek describes it, is "translating ideas from policy speak into soaring moral prose." One of his key ideas: The endgame of free enterprise is not to preserve wealth but to create opportunity for the poor. This week on Moyers & Company (check local listings), Moyers and Brooks engage in a lively exchange over the safety net, which Brooks supports for the very poor, and a hike in the minimum wage, which he opposes. "The problem with the minimum wage is that it hurts the people it's supposed to help," he claims. "...It's the worst way to try to wipe out the unemployment scourge that we have in this country. We don't have a low wage problem. We have an unemployment problem in the bottom 50%. America has left the bottom behind. And we have a conspiracy -- we have a left wing politically that talks about solutions, but has no implementable answers that actually help poor people. And we have a right wing that traditionally doesn't even talk about poverty." Moyers presses Brooks on why companies like Target, McDonald's and Walmart don't pay a living wage to their employees who then have to rely on public programs to support themselves - in Walmart's case, about $4,000 per worker. Brooks argues the market doesn't support higher wages and agrees that the country needs public policies that make work pay for those who perform it. While "free enterprise is a system of institutions and cultural values that respect the individual," he says, "... it has no hostility" toward the idea of government or a safety net. Once a classical musician who took his French horn on the road with the fabled guitarist Charlie Byrd, - Arthur Brooks taught economics, government and social entrepreneurship at Syracuse University. He is the author of hundreds of articles and ten books, including his most recent, "The Road to Freedom: How to Win the Fight for Free Enterprise."
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Jul 27th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #328
The Crusade Against Reproductive Rights
Roe v. Wade, the Supreme Court's landmark decision establishing a woman's right to an abortion, was issued more than 40 years ago, but conservatives and the religious right have been crusading ever since to have it overturned. Despite consistent public opinion to the contrary, they have patiently and relentlessly campaigned against the ruling. Their efforts are finding some success. Two major decisions and a surprise emergency ruling by the Supreme Court this last session limited health insurance coverage for contraception and gave protesters increased rights to demonstrate outside abortion clinics. Several states -- especially in the South -- and in the name, they say, of women's health, have passed regulations that creatively use technicalities to limit access to clinics. Bill Moyers talks about the politics of reproductive freedom with Cecile Richards, president of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America and the Planned Parenthood Action Fund. For nearly a century, Planned Parenthood has been the leading advocate for reproductive health care in the United States, with 69 affiliates nationwide, operating more than 700 health centers. Cecile Richards has been an organizer of low-wage janitors, hotel and health care workers, the founder of the Texas Freedom Network, which defends civil liberties and religious freedom in her native state, and a deputy chief of staff to the Democratic leader in the House, Nancy Pelosi.
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Jul 20th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #327
Is The Supreme Court Out of Order?
The latest session of the US Supreme Court -- just ended -- was especially contentious, with important decisions on the separation of church and state, organized labor, campaign finance reform and birth control, among others, splitting the court along its 5-4 conservative/liberal divide. What's more, critics increasingly question whether the court is as corrupted by the influence of big money as the US Congress that sits just across Capitol Hill. On the other hand, nearly two-thirds of the court's decisions this term were unanimous -- the first time that's happened in more than sixty years. But there's more to that seeming unanimity than meets the eye: in some instances, conservative justices went along but expressed their wish that the court had gone even further to the right, and many believe that some of the decisions might simply be a preliminary step toward a more significant breaking of legal precedent in years to come. All of these nuances are best assessed by two experienced and knowledgeable reporters for whom the Supreme Court has been both their beat and the target of their interpretive skills. They talk with Bill Moyers on this week's edition of Moyers & Company (check local listings). Linda Greenhouse covered the Supreme Court for The New York Times for thirty years and still writes a bi-weekly column on the law for that newspaper. She is a lecturer, senior research scholar and the Knight Distinguished Journalist in Residence at the Yale Law School. Dahlia Lithwick is a National Magazine Award winner and a senior editor at Slate.com, where she writes the website's "Supreme Court Dispatches" and "Jurisprudence" columns. Currently, she is working on a book about the four women who have served as Supreme Court justices.
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Jul 13th @ 11:29 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #326
Grassroots Grow Against Greed
This Fourth of July weekend, as the United States celebrates independence and democracy, Moyers & Company pays tribute to the champions of grass roots action fighting against the moneyed interests trying to buy and control government. These populists are seeking real change -- not from the right or the left but from the bottom up. One of their most articulate spokesmen is writer and commentator Jim Hightower, who travels the country preaching the gospel of populism. A former congressional aide and two-term agriculture commissioner of his native Texas, he is the author of several books of progressive wit and wisdom and edits a newsletter, "The Hightower Lowdown." Hightower tells Bill Moyers, "There is a growing rebellion and an increasing awareness among different groups fighting different battle that they are connected... People are beginning to get together and see their common interest." He adds, "There is a greater power that is building up in the countryside, simmering, bubbling in different places and that's going to come together." Following Hightower's conversation with Bill Moyers, a documentary spotlights the recent Rising Voices for a New Economy conference in Washington, D.C., at which 1100 grass roots members of the National Domestic Workers Alliance (NDWA) and the National People's Action Together (NPA) rallied to learn organizing methods and put truth to the power of government and corporate America. According to NDWA director Ai-jen Poo, "The interests and forces that we're up against are so very powerful that we can't afford not to build a movement that is as inclusive and is broad and as deep as it can possibly be." NPA director George Goehl agrees but cautions that it means, "All of us bending towards each other. It means all of us giving up some control and some of what we would love to have be at the center of the fight so we could collectively have more power."
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Jul 6th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.


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