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Moyers & Company
Bill Moyers returns on-air and online in January 2012 with MOYERS & COMPANY, a weekly hour of compelling and vital conversation about life and the state of American democracy, featuring some of the best thinkers of our time. A range of scholars, artists, activists, scientists, philosophers and newsmakers bring context, insight and meaning to important topics. The series occasionally includes Moyers' own timely and penetrating essays on society and government. In a multimedia marketplace saturated with shallow sound bites and partisan name-calling, MOYERS & COMPANY digs deeper. As the Los Angeles Times put it in 2010, "No one on television has centralized the discussion of ideas as much as Moyers... He not only gives a forum to unusual thinkers, he is truly interested in what they have to say and who they are because he believes their ideas really matter. "

Below is a list of broadcasts scheduled to air in the next 60 days on any of our three channels.

Episode #315
What The One Percent Don't Want You To Know
The book that's the talk of academia and the media world isn't a political or celebrity tell-all or the work of a self-help guru. Capital in the Twenty-First Century, by Thomas Piketty, a 42-year-old who teaches at the Paris School of Economics, is an exhaustive study of the history and future of capitalism that confirms what many have believed for a long time - that we have returned to a Gilded Age of extreme income inequality in which vast wealth is more and more concentrated in the hands of a very few, while wages remain stagnant for those workers still managing to hold onto a job. This week on Moyers & Company (check local listings), Bill Moyers talks with Nobel Prize-winning economist and New York Times columnist Paul Krugman, who has described Capital in the Twenty-First Century as "a magnificent, sweeping meditation on inequality... that will change both the way we think about society and the way we do economics." In the latest issue of The New York Review of Books, Krugman writes, "At a time when the concentration of wealth and income in the hands of a few has resurfaced as a central political issue, Piketty doesn't just offer invaluable documentation of what is happening, with unmatched historical depth. He also offers what amounts to a unified field theory of inequality." But, Krugman notes, the book "makes it clear that public policy can make an enormous difference, that even if the underlying economic conditions point toward extreme inequality, what Piketty calls 'a drift toward oligarchy' can be halted and even reversed if the body politic so chooses." Paul Krugman teaches economics and international affairs at Princeton, and will become a professor at the City University of New York's Graduate Center and a distinguished scholar at CUNY's Luxembourg Income Study Center.
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Apr 20th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No upcoming airings of this
episode on this channel.

tpt Life Channel 2.3

Sat Apr 19th @ 3:00 am

Episode #316
Airs Friday April 25th
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Apr 27th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No upcoming airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #317
Airs Friday May 2nd
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun May 4th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No upcoming airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #318
Airs Friday May 9th
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun May 11th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No upcoming airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #319
Airs Friday May 16th
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun May 18th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No upcoming airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #320
Airs Friday May 23rd
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun May 25th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No upcoming airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #321
Airs Friday May 30th
24 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

No upcoming airings of this
episode on this channel.

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No upcoming airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #322
Airs Friday June 6th
24 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

No upcoming airings of this
episode on this channel.

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No upcoming airings of this
episode on this channel.

tpt Life Channel 2.3

Fri Jun 6th @ 9:00 pm

Episode #323
Airs Friday June 13th
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

No upcoming airings of this
episode on this channel.

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No upcoming airings of this
episode on this channel.

tpt Life Channel 2.3

Fri Jun 13th @ 9:00 pm


This list includes any broadcasts that aired in the past 2 months on any of our three channels.

Episode #315
What The One Percent Don't Want You To Know
The book that's the talk of academia and the media world isn't a political or celebrity tell-all or the work of a self-help guru. Capital in the Twenty-First Century, by Thomas Piketty, a 42-year-old who teaches at the Paris School of Economics, is an exhaustive study of the history and future of capitalism that confirms what many have believed for a long time - that we have returned to a Gilded Age of extreme income inequality in which vast wealth is more and more concentrated in the hands of a very few, while wages remain stagnant for those workers still managing to hold onto a job. This week on Moyers & Company (check local listings), Bill Moyers talks with Nobel Prize-winning economist and New York Times columnist Paul Krugman, who has described Capital in the Twenty-First Century as "a magnificent, sweeping meditation on inequality... that will change both the way we think about society and the way we do economics." In the latest issue of The New York Review of Books, Krugman writes, "At a time when the concentration of wealth and income in the hands of a few has resurfaced as a central political issue, Piketty doesn't just offer invaluable documentation of what is happening, with unmatched historical depth. He also offers what amounts to a unified field theory of inequality." But, Krugman notes, the book "makes it clear that public policy can make an enormous difference, that even if the underlying economic conditions point toward extreme inequality, what Piketty calls 'a drift toward oligarchy' can be halted and even reversed if the body politic so chooses." Paul Krugman teaches economics and international affairs at Princeton, and will become a professor at the City University of New York's Graduate Center and a distinguished scholar at CUNY's Luxembourg Income Study Center.
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

tpt Life Channel 2.3

Fri Apr 18th @ 9:00 pm

Episode #314
Fighting For The Four Freedoms
In January 1941, less than a year before Pearl Harbor and America's entry into World War II, President Franklin D. Roosevelt's State of the Union address made it clear that a fight was inevitable, a fight to preserve, protect and defend four essential freedoms: freedom of speech and religion and freedom from want and fear. This week on Moyers & Company (check local listings), historian Harvey J. Kaye, author of the new book, The Fight for the Four Freedoms: What Made FDR and the Greatest Generation Truly Great, talks with Bill Moyers about FDR's speech and how it was the cornerstone for the kind of progressive society Roosevelt hoped for but did not live to see at war's end. Today, the Four Freedoms have been diminished and defiled by a society that gives money and power the strongest voice. Kaye says, "Look what we've done and look what we're allowing to happen now. This cannot be the America that I imagined and most of my fellow Americans imagined." But, he continues, Americans "Have not forgotten the Four Freedoms as ideals. They have forgotten what it takes to realize them, that we must defend, sustain and secure democracy by enhancing it. That's what Roosevelt knew. That's what Jefferson knew. And no one seems to remember that today. That's what we have to remind people of. "We need to remember that we're the children and the grandchildren of the generation that beat the Great Depression and defeated fascism and imperialism in World War II and went on to create the strongest and most prosperous country in human history. And how did they do that? By making America freer, more equal and more democratic." Harvey J. Kaye is the Ben and Joyce Rosenberg Professor of Democracy and Justice Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay and director of the school's Center for History and Social Change. The broadcast concludes with a Bill Moyers essay remembering his father's reaction to FDR's death, 69 years ago this week. Moyers & Company airs weekly on public television.
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Apr 13th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #313
All Work and No Pay
You've heard about the wave of protests against fast food chains like McDonald's and Burger King where employees are forced to live on next to nothing. Workers in regular, sit-down restaurants are also penalized. Back in 1991, the National Restaurant Association - often called "the other NRA" -- passed around enough campaign contributions to persuade Congress to set the Federal minimum wage for waiters, busboys, and bartenders at only $2.13 an hour. They claim that tips are additional income that makes up the difference. But tips are random and often meager. Restaurant workers struggling to earn a living are twice as likely to be on public assistance. This week on Moyers & Company (check local listings), Bill Moyers talks with Saru Jayaraman, co-founder and co-director of ROC-United -- the Restaurant Opportunities Centers United, whose 13,000 members across the country are fighting for better wages and working conditions. Because ROC has been making headway, they've got powerful enemies, including Rick Berman, a Washington-based lawyer and p.r. man, dubbed "Dr. Evil" by 60 Minutes, who specializes in industry-funded attack campaigns against health and safety regulations, the minimum wage and organized labor. "In any other context, what is it called when an employer practically doesn't pay their workers, full-time workers? It's called slavery," Saru Jayaraman tells Moyers. "... And so how is it that a major industry has basically convinced America, convinced Congress, that they practically shouldn't have to pay their workers at all? It's purely money and power. And their control over our legislators." But she remains hopeful: "There's nothing that people cannot achieve once they expose those forces and once they resist... We can actually overcome even the most hardened, monied lobbyists in Washington, DC, or in states around the country. Because ultimately, if we are a true democracy, we cannot cede our democratic powers to these people." Saru Jayaraman is also director of the Food Labor Research Center at the University of California, Berkeley and the author of Behind the Kitchen Door.
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Apr 6th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #312
Public Schools For Sale?
Public education has become big business. Privatizing schools could yield profits worth hundreds of billions. Diane Ravitch says that has to stop. As an assistant secretary of education under the first President Bush, she was an advocate of school choice and charter schools and supported the No Child Left Behind initiative of the second President Bush. But after careful investigation, she changed her mind, and has become, according to Salon.com, "the nation's highest profile opponent" of charter-based education. On this week's Moyers & Company (check local listings), she tells Bill Moyers, "Privatizing public education is not a good project... [Instead] we should all do what we can to first of all address the most serious problem in America, which is the huge gaps of income, the huge inequalities gap in both wealth and income." She believes, "Where our public schools are in trouble it's because the community's in trouble. And instead of breaking up public schools and sending the kids off into the hands of some entrepreneurs, we should be addressing those problems, the needs and problems of the children." Public education, she says, "is one of the foundation stones of our democracy. So an attack on public education is an attack on democracy." Diane Ravitch is America's preeminent historian of public education. Her newest book is Reign of Error: The Hoax of the Privatization Movement and the Danger to America's Public Schools.
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Mar 30th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #311
Who's Buying Our Midterm Elections?
This week on Moyers & Company (check local listings), the Supreme Court is poised to issue another big decision on campaign finance, one that could further open the floodgates to unfettered and anonymous contributions, just as the Citizens United case did four years ago. Bill Moyers talks with investigative journalists Kim Barker and Andy Kroll, who have made following the money - campaign money -- their business. Three times as much money already has been raised for this year's midterm elections as four years ago, when the Citizens United decision was announced. "As soon as you get into office, you have to start raising money for the next election," Kim Barker tells Moyers. "It means you can't take a stand on an issue that might prove unpopular... It just sort of means that we're going to get more of the same, more of this gridlock, which benefits a lot of these same billionaires that are putting money into the system in the first place." Andy Kroll adds, "I had a conversation with a progressive senator who is not a fan of super PACs and at the time did not have his own sort of individual super PAC... And I said, 'What is this like when you're going to go up against an opponent who does have a super PAC and does have a motivated one percenter in his corner?' And he said, 'It's like going into a boxing ring. I'm wearing boxing gloves. And the other guy has an Uzi.'" Kim Barker has been with the independent, non-profit news organization ProPublica since 2010, the year of Citizens United. Andy Kroll works in the Washington bureau of Mother Jones magazine.
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Mar 23rd @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #310
No Escaping Dragnet Nation
This week on Moyers & Company (check local listings), as Edward Snowden, the NSA whistleblower and Senator Dianne Feinstein, usually a staunch defender of the intelligence community, loudly and publicly speak out against the intrusion of internet spying, Bill talks with investigative reporter Julia Angwin, author of Dragnet Nation: A Quest for Privacy, Security and Freedom in a World of Relentless Surveillance. Her book chronicles a cyberworld of indiscriminate tracking, where government and business are stockpiling data about us at an unprecedented pace. Today's headlines make Angwin's findings even more relevant and powerful. Julia Angwin set out to see if she could escape the dragnets that were secretly collecting even the most mundane details of her everyday life. She told Google good-bye, unfriended Facebook, unlinked from LinkedIn - and discovered just how difficult it is to untether the electronic umbilical cord and escape scrutiny. Reporters are a prime target for internet snooping, says Angwin, "Journalists are the canary in the coal mine. We're the first ones to seriously feel the impact of total surveillance, which means we can't protect our sources. But what happens next? What happens next is we're not good watch dogs for democracy. And that's a very worrisome situation." She wondered whether government snooping is the price of security: "I thought, 'Okay, let's see, maybe this is really worth it. Maybe we're going to find out that we're really safe.' So I looked at all the literature about government surveillance and crime and how much does it work. And what I found is, it's not particularly effective." Julia Angwin, a Pulitzer Prize winning reporter, covered the business and technology beat at The Wall Street Journal for thirteen years, and is now working for the independent news organization ProPublica.
24 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Mar 16th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #309
The Dog Whistle Politics of Race, PArt 2
This week on Moyers & Company (check local listings), more from author and legal scholar Ian Haney Lopez as he talks further with Bill about dog whistle politics - code words that use race to turn Americans against each other. Politicians manipulate deep prejudice to rouse hostility against minorities and the government, and summon support for policies that make economic inequality even worse. According to Haney Lopez, "This use of race has allowed an extreme faction of conservatives, those most dedicated to the power of big money, to the power of corporations to not only hijack American democracy, but to hijack the Republican Party." He reviews the use of the dog whistle in recent political history, from the "Southern strategy" developed by Republicans in the 60s and Democratic President Bill Clinton's welfare reform and anti-crime policies, to the tea party movement - which he says has legitimate issues but has "accepted the conservative line that was happened in their lives is really the fault of minorities" -- and current attacks on President Obama's Affordable Care Act: "The subtext is, 'Here comes a black man who exemplifies the way in which the Federal government is now by and for minorities." "Dog whistling" is going to evolve, Haney Lopez says "in a way that brings in certain portions of the Latino population, certain portions of the Asian population, that's what it's likely to do. Unless we start addressing this within minority communities, but also in terms of national politics, we should expect these sorts of racial provocations to continue to define our politics for the next decade, two decades, three decades." Ian Haney Lopez, a professor of law at the University of California, Berkeley, is a senior fellow at the policy analysis and advocacy group, Demos.
24 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Mar 9th @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #308
Ian Haney Lopez On The Dog Whistle Politics of Rac
This week on Moyers & Company (check local listings), author and legal scholar Ian Haney Lopez joins Bill to talk about dog whistle politics and how racism has changed in America since the civil rights era. The dog whistle of racism, says Ian Haney Lopez, is "the dark magic" by which middle-class voters have been seduced to vote against their own economic interests. Politicians have mastered the use of dog whistles - code words that turn Americans against each other while turning America over to plutocrats. And yet, "Dog whistle politics doesn't come out of animus at all." Lopez tells Moyers. "It doesn't come out of some desire to hurt minorities. It comes out of a desire to win votes. And in that sense, I want to start using the term strategic racism. It's racism as a strategy. It's cold, it's calculating, it's considered, it's the decision to achieve one's own ends, here winning votes, by stirring racial animosity." "And here's a hard, difficult truth. Most racists are good people," he claims. "They're not sick. They're not ruled by anger or raw emotion or hatred. They are complicated people reared in complicated societies. They're fully capable of generosity, of empathy, of real kindness. But because of the idea systems in which they're reared, they're also capable of dehumanizing others and occasionally of brutal violence." Ian Haney Lopez, a professor of law at the University of California, Berkeley, is a senior fellow at the policy analysis and advocacy group, Demos.
24 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Mar 2nd @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.

Episode #307
The Deep State Hiding in Plain Sight
This week on Moyers & Company (check local listings), former Capitol Hill insider Mike Lofgren talks with Bill Moyers about "Anatomy of the Deep State," an essay he has written exclusively for the Moyers website, BillMoyers.com. Mike Lofgren was a numbers man, a congressional staff member for 28 years with the powerful House and Senate Budget committees. Over the years, as he crunched the numbers, he realized they didn't add up. Instead, they led him to what he calls America's Deep State - a phrase he borrowed from British spy novelist John Le Carre -- a government just beneath the surface where elected and unelected figures collude to protect and serve powerful vested interests. "It is the big story of our time," Lofgren tells Moyers. "It is, I would say, the red thread that runs through the history of the last three decades. It's how we had deregulation, financialization of the economy, the Wall Street bust, the erosion of our civil liberties, and perpetual war." In his essay, Lofgren describes the Deep State as "a hybrid association of elements of government and parts of top-level finance and industry that is effectively able to govern the United States without reference to the consent of the governed." But, as he says to Moyers in their conversation, the power and wealth generated by this Deep State "does not trickle down. Our inequality is as great or greater than any time since the 1920s. Nevertheless, corporate profits are at record highs, while unemployment remains very high and tens of millions of people are on food stamps. That isn't a natural evolution. Something made it happen." That something, Lofgren says, is the Deep State. Now retired from congressional politics, Mike Lofgren is author of the book, "The Party Is Over: How Republicans Went Crazy, Democrats Became Useless and the Middle Class Got Shafted."
26 minutes long
tpt Channel 2.1

Sun Feb 23rd @ 11:30 am

tpt MN Channel 2.2

No previous airings of this
episode on this channel.


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